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20130113
20130121
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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
that barack obama is self-confident and you see a seemingly different president to d today than we saw a year or two ago when we went through the debt nonsense in the middle of 2011. i think that he feels much more able to pull the strings and know what the power is and isn't. he's been scandal-free, and in part, that comes from the top. no disrespect to any of the presidents who got into problems bu but he sets a standard that people know the line they have to tow and they know it and that is why the administration has done well, and he will have the republicans at him and that is going to keep him from the overreach from the republicans. >> and history is what the president has to worry about, because this is almost like deja vu all over again and it takes the scandal out of f the scandal out of it, but the fog of war and what may happen, and what the president has to be cognizant of and not just the presidents that you mentioned, but lyndon baines johnson and other presidents that in the second term things happen o outside of their reach, and he needs to be cognizant of history. >> thank
remember that inspiring call from president obama exactly four years, to end partisan politics. if you were keeping score, and we are, that promise would actually fall into the incomplete category. promises considered, mostly clept, more jobs and a middle class tax break, ending the wars in iraq and afghanistan and, of course, making health care accessible for all. tomorrow morning the president will be making even more promises. the question though, can he keep them? back with me now bill schneider, resident fellow for the think tank and lynn sweet of the chicago sun times." bill, your organization spends a fair amount of time on important issues of the day. what promises can we expect to hear from president obama tomorrow? >> immigration reform. i mean, that's something he neglected in his first term and didn't give it any real priority, and it's very important. really helped him get elected, re-elected rather. guns will come up, i think, because the mood is right for that. i'm not sure how far he'll be able to go with that because of the resistance in the house, but he'll fight the good
as the president's top domestic policy adviser. well, she left the obama white house about a year ago. she's with us now on inauguration day here on the national mall. melody, four years ago, it was history. it was hope. it was change. as this president begins the second term, still a sluggish economy, a polarized political environment, what is the number one challenge as he prepares to address the american people tomorrow? >> well, i still think it is about the hope of the american people, and it is still historic, the second inauguration of this president. but at the same time, obviously, it's going to be working with congress to get the economy moving, moving forward in terms of the big initiatives that the president considers to be so important with regard to immigration reform, implementation of health care reform and making sure that everybody has an opportunity, has a shot at the american dream. >> you mentioned health care reform. you know, republicans would say he did that first last time. he got in our face. that ruined the environment. i know each side blames the other side. i d
is making -- >> now these apps that 4-year-olds can use after these commercials that target the obama children politically, those numbers, i think, are going to continue to break. i'm telling you, robert gibbs, these people are causing serious damage to their brand and more importantly to the cause of the second amendment. >> i absolutely don't disagree. i mean, i think they have done more so set back their own cause. but let's peer through some of the twisted logic in some of what they've done. i mean, the notion from wayne lapierre that the only way to match a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun, why do we provide the bad guys with the type of weapons that they use in afghanistan? why are we -- why are we dependent upon having a good guy with a gun? we're depending on that, in their logic, because we've decided that what we -- what we hunt the taliban with is okay to have in your neighborhood. that doesn't make any sense. >> and by the way, robert, on that front -- >> i'll say this. you and i are from the south, right? >> right. >> hunting is important. i was never a hunter,
mentioned for many. for many years obviously there were no women in the cabinet. but it's not good enough. i think the obama administration is saying we are noticing you are not putting women in, i think is important. >> amanda, why didn't we see the same kind of reaction particularly from the right, you know, when bush was approximatelypresident? i found it kind of striking yesterday on "meet the press"that, you know, mike murphy and hailee barber were making shots. >> on diversity. >> exactly. it's just -- it kind of begs the question of credibility from the attackers. >> uh-huh. >> do you think it's a fair point? >> well, i think that -- i mean this may say a lot about the republican party but not as much as -- not as much as expected from the republican party when it comes to diversity. i think that hailee barber has accould the republican party is terrible b it comes to reaching out to women of color. it says a lot. president obama, himself, has held up the diversity of has cabinet as something sort of extraordinary. when you do that, you are setting you
years. a new article about king coal and he joins me now. reed, it's interesting. people will look at this and say, oh, this is just a reaction to president obama. and what i wanted to make sure people understood is this is something, it's more about as the environmental movement became more synonymous with the democratic party, and this is split. because coal workers are union guys. >> and this is part of a large shift that's happened a couple of times in. the unionization movement grew, labor became a huge force and democrats basically controlled west virginia and kentucky on and off. for the better part of the 20th century. then after bill clinton's administration, democrats came to rely more on environmentalists as a leg of their stool. the environmental movement grew and democrats became more of a coastal country, coastal party that is and the party has slipped over the last couple of decades. the republicans won the kentucky state senate in 2000. one of the few highlights was knocking off ben chandler in kentucky. >> republicans made gains in west virginia in their house dele
. the republican . -- the republican line. caller: mr. obama, they say it is not his fault. he has had for years. he said he would cut the deficit in half. they passed the deficit a year ago, about cutting this. why is it not being cut now? i have been told both sides are not getting along, but he is the president, and he needs to lead. i do not understand how there are billions of dollars across the world to different countries. i know we do that for specific reasons, but we should be using some of that money to pay our deficits off. what i do not understand is, why are we continuing to do that, to help everybody else out and we should be taking care of our own country? host: let me show you the front page of the new york times. if we can move over -- we will move it over, here it is right here, a wide shot -- will be focusing on senator hagel in a couple of minutes and looking back at some of the things he has said over his tenure in the u.s. senate. that line from "the new york times" -- also from "the hartford courant" -- "the arizona republic repor" -- some local stories, beginning with "th
over here, by the way it is illustrative once a year, for the barbecue on the south lawn. we always have -- we have a great time, he says. >> obama: when i'm over here at the congressional picnic and folks are coming up and taking pictures with their family, i promise you, michelle and i are very nice to them and we have a wonderful time. but it doesn't prevent them from going on to the floor of the house and blasting me for being a big-spending socialist. >> bill: that kind of goes with the territory. >> yeah. i think every president has to deal with that. >> bill: yeah. there are those. but people tend to be nice. civil. somebody asked me the other day like when i get recognized out shopping or restaurants or kind of whatever, how many people really come up to me and say i hate your guts? and it is almost nobody ever does. there are a lot of people that hate my guts but the people that come up usually just say hi, how are you? nice to see you. enjoy your program or love your work or whatever. >> you realize you just opened up pandora's box. because the next time you get seen -- >>
to achieve over the next four years? guest: i think it signals two things. one signals that he wants an independent, no-nonsense voice at the table on the president. senator chuck hagel has had a close relationship with president obama. and i happen to know from a number of sources that the quality of conversation, that the nature of their conversation is a very direct, often not in agreement and that the president is not bringing on board a yes man. the second thing we need to know is that we have been dealing with chuck hagel and a way that we ought to be debating the secretary of state. this will be the secretary of defense. this is about deploying power or run the world and managing strategic assets and managing a shift where the president has said that we now have or did we have overweighted our resources in the middle east and south asia and we have underweighted our presence in asia looking at china. that shift is like moving a giant ship of spending, resources, american men and women being deployed in different places, as well as strategic asset purchasing, what weapons and t
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)